Books Similar to Braxton Bragg: The Most Hated Man of the Confederacy (Civil War America)

Are you interested in finding books similar to Braxton Bragg: The Most Hated Man of the Confederacy (Civil War America) by Earl J. Hess? Braxton Bragg: The Most Hated Man of the Confederacy (Civil War America) can best be described as follows: As a leading Confederate general, Braxton Bragg (18171876) earned a reputation for incompetence, for wantonly shooting his own soldiers, and for losing battles. This public image established him not only as a scapegoat for the South’s military failures but also as the chief whipping boy of the Confederacy..

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Books Similar to Braxton Bragg: The Most Hated Man of the Confederacy (Civil War America)

1. William Tecumseh Sherman: In the Service of My Country: A Life by author James Lee McDonough.
Description: A major new biography of one of Americas most storied military figures. General Shermans 1864 burning of Atlanta solidified his legacy as a ruthless leader.

2. Pickett’s Charge: A New Look at Gettysburgs Final Attack by author Ph.D. Phillip Thomas Tucker.
Description: Main Selection of the History Book ClubThe Battle of Gettysburg, the Civil Wars turning point, produced over 57,000 casualties, the largest number from the entire war that was itself Americas bloodiest conflict. On the third day of fierce fighting, Robert E.

3. The Chickamauga Campaign_Barren Victory: The Retreat into Chattanooga, the Confederate Pursuit, and the Aftermath of the Battle, September 21 to October 20, 1863 by author David A. Powell.
Description: Barren Victory is the third and concluding volume of the magisterial Chickamauga Campaign Trilogy, a comprehensive examination more than a decade in the making of one of the most important and complex military operations of the Civil War.The first installment, A Mad Irregular Battle, introduced readers to the major characters of this sweeping drama and carried them from the Union crossing of the Tennessee River in August 1863 up through the bloody but inconclusive combat of the first and second days of the battle (September 18 and 19, 1863).

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